Yet another book blog

You should be my friend.

8 out of 70: The Iroquois Ceremonial of Midwinter by Elisabeth Tooker
I end up having to read a lot for my classes but rarely do I have to read entire books. It just so happens that I had to read this whole book so i’m including it, because anytime I have to read 160 pages of anthropological reporting on native american ritual, well i’m putting it on this list.
It was an anthropology field report. A very extensive one. One that compared many different instances to each other and showed impressive cases of change over time.
Would I read it for fun? Dear god no. Was it interesting, kind of. In context with what we were learning in class was it useful and illuminated key points? Yes. 
So overall not a complete unnecessary waste of time. 

8 out of 70: The Iroquois Ceremonial of Midwinter by Elisabeth Tooker

I end up having to read a lot for my classes but rarely do I have to read entire books. It just so happens that I had to read this whole book so i’m including it, because anytime I have to read 160 pages of anthropological reporting on native american ritual, well i’m putting it on this list.

It was an anthropology field report. A very extensive one. One that compared many different instances to each other and showed impressive cases of change over time.

Would I read it for fun? Dear god no. Was it interesting, kind of. In context with what we were learning in class was it useful and illuminated key points? Yes. 

So overall not a complete unnecessary waste of time. 

fuckyeahgaiman:

Neil Gaiman has revealed that a film adaptation of his book American Gods is in the works.

The novel, first published in 2001, takes place in a world in which gods and mythological creatures exist.

In a recent interview, Gaiman exclusively revealed to DS that a director “who has many, many Oscars” is already on board the project.

“I’m going to be having a meeting in LA with the people that the film rights have been sold to,” he confirmed. “I’m going to be… talking to them, find out where they’re going and if there’s any way that I can help.”

He also described the unnamed director attached to the film as “a genius”.

“He fell in love with this [novel] about six or seven years ago and has not given up,” explained the writer.

Watch Neil Gaiman discuss the upcoming American Gods film in full below.

[or by clicking the link]

EVERYBODY PANIC

Not a book post but a supremely awesome thing post. Related to book #7!

So excited!

Book 7 of 70: American Gods by Neil Gaiman
(Look ma! I’m 10% done!)
Another re-read. I haven’t read this book since highschool and my mother got it for me for Christmas, and i’ve been dying to read it again, seeing as how I forgot pretty much everything, which is the point at which I like to read books again, so I only spoil about 50% of it. Sometimes a terrible memory comes in handy.
I would definitely recommend this book to everyone I know. In fact I have. It’s so detailed and perfect I can’t believe it, there are these subtle references and illusions to gods and religions throughout this whole book and sometimes, if you’re a big enough religion nerd like I am, you will get them and sit there laughing like an idiot over a pun Gaiman made about the Hindu Pantheon. Nerd lyfe.
This book keeps you on your toes, and forces you to pay attention, there are so many fine details that you have to pull together in order to really grasp some of the conclusions it almost reads like a detective novel in some ways. The cast of characters is of course fantastic, with every god, minor, major, almost every culture, and all brilliantly researched.
Being an avid reader of Gaiman’s works, it’s nice seeing similarities in American Gods to his other works, namely Sandman and his short stories. They way he talks about the hurts you inflict on other people and the judgement of your soul, when Shadow is being Judged by Anubis, is very similar to his short story Other People and I loved that. I love Gaiman’s rhetoric, how you can tell what he likes to write the most by how often it appears in his works, his personal reoccuring themes. 
Overall, read this book. Read it again. And then read it a third time with your computer open and wikipedia up, and follow the characters histories, and research the places, and try to recognize just how brilliant of a human Mr. Gaiman must be in order to write such stunningly detailed works such as this.

Book 7 of 70: American Gods by Neil Gaiman

(Look ma! I’m 10% done!)

Another re-read. I haven’t read this book since highschool and my mother got it for me for Christmas, and i’ve been dying to read it again, seeing as how I forgot pretty much everything, which is the point at which I like to read books again, so I only spoil about 50% of it. Sometimes a terrible memory comes in handy.

I would definitely recommend this book to everyone I know. In fact I have. It’s so detailed and perfect I can’t believe it, there are these subtle references and illusions to gods and religions throughout this whole book and sometimes, if you’re a big enough religion nerd like I am, you will get them and sit there laughing like an idiot over a pun Gaiman made about the Hindu Pantheon. Nerd lyfe.

This book keeps you on your toes, and forces you to pay attention, there are so many fine details that you have to pull together in order to really grasp some of the conclusions it almost reads like a detective novel in some ways. The cast of characters is of course fantastic, with every god, minor, major, almost every culture, and all brilliantly researched.

Being an avid reader of Gaiman’s works, it’s nice seeing similarities in American Gods to his other works, namely Sandman and his short stories. They way he talks about the hurts you inflict on other people and the judgement of your soul, when Shadow is being Judged by Anubis, is very similar to his short story Other People and I loved that. I love Gaiman’s rhetoric, how you can tell what he likes to write the most by how often it appears in his works, his personal reoccuring themes. 

Overall, read this book. Read it again. And then read it a third time with your computer open and wikipedia up, and follow the characters histories, and research the places, and try to recognize just how brilliant of a human Mr. Gaiman must be in order to write such stunningly detailed works such as this.

6 or 70: Proof by David Auburn
I was obsessed with this play in Highschool. My senior year I directed one of the scenes for our night of Student directed scenes. This is my absolute favorite play.
I was going through my shelves looking for Siddhartha by Herman Hesse so I could start that, when I stumbled across this play again. So I of course veered from that path and read this instead. Some of it out loud with Mando reading the boy parts. Like dorks.
If you haven’t read Proof, I highly recommend it. It’s one of the most emotional plays i’ve ever read, it’s an emotion driven play. It’s careful dialogue which reveals very strained relationships and questions the lines between sanity and insanity. It’s also beautiful.

6 or 70: Proof by David Auburn

I was obsessed with this play in Highschool. My senior year I directed one of the scenes for our night of Student directed scenes. This is my absolute favorite play.

I was going through my shelves looking for Siddhartha by Herman Hesse so I could start that, when I stumbled across this play again. So I of course veered from that path and read this instead. Some of it out loud with Mando reading the boy parts. Like dorks.

If you haven’t read Proof, I highly recommend it. It’s one of the most emotional plays i’ve ever read, it’s an emotion driven play. It’s careful dialogue which reveals very strained relationships and questions the lines between sanity and insanity. It’s also beautiful.

5 of 70: The Prophet by Khalil Gibran
Started: 1/4/11Finished: 1/5/11
I’ve wanted to read this book for a very long time now, but recently mando loaned it to me to read over break, as it’s one of his favorites. And i’m very upset with myself for not reading it sooner.  
This is a very small book, only a hundred pages or so, and it’s no taller than my hand so the pages are small too. However there is more truth in this one small book than most books could ever hope to achieve. The things said within, I would like to think would be self evident and simple, but it’s oftentimes the simple obvious things that we’re not good at articulating or understanding. So as i’ve read through this I just feel like i’m being told all these things I already knew but never realized, and in some cases, being made to think about things in a different way. 
I read this book on my lunch breaks at work, and let me tell you how hard it is to read a book in a break room full of people who don’t read, and therefore don’t understand the importance of being left alone when reading. I eventually would get up and lock myself in the small computer room to finish my break out so I could really concentrate on the words, because I got tired of being interrupted mid thought with “ooooh whatchu reading there? A book? What’s it about? Oh, is it religious? Oh, well I don’t read too much, but I love the bible.” oh really thats great, please leave me alone. I’m trying to reevaluate my views on passion and reason thankyouverymuch.
Read this book. Read it now.

5 of 70: The Prophet by Khalil Gibran

Started: 1/4/11
Finished: 1/5/11

I’ve wanted to read this book for a very long time now, but recently mando loaned it to me to read over break, as it’s one of his favorites. And i’m very upset with myself for not reading it sooner.  

This is a very small book, only a hundred pages or so, and it’s no taller than my hand so the pages are small too. However there is more truth in this one small book than most books could ever hope to achieve. The things said within, I would like to think would be self evident and simple, but it’s oftentimes the simple obvious things that we’re not good at articulating or understanding. So as i’ve read through this I just feel like i’m being told all these things I already knew but never realized, and in some cases, being made to think about things in a different way. 

I read this book on my lunch breaks at work, and let me tell you how hard it is to read a book in a break room full of people who don’t read, and therefore don’t understand the importance of being left alone when reading. I eventually would get up and lock myself in the small computer room to finish my break out so I could really concentrate on the words, because I got tired of being interrupted mid thought with “ooooh whatchu reading there? A book? What’s it about? Oh, is it religious? Oh, well I don’t read too much, but I love the bible.” oh really thats great, please leave me alone. I’m trying to reevaluate my views on passion and reason thankyouverymuch.

Read this book. Read it now.

4 of 70: The Walking Dead Book 2
Started: 12/28/10Finished: 12/28/10
I started this book on my second trip back home. I stopped for the night at our lakehouse in Somerville to be with my family who had been up there while I was back at work in Austin for 2 days. By the time I got to the house, I felt like complete crap. My sugar had crashed earlier in the day and I had a massive headache which was causing me to be nauseous, and then I drove for an hour and a half in dim light to the house, in the rain. But enough complaining: suffice it to say, I felt like crap. So after I arrived and crashed for a good hour or so, I woke up, feeling a little better, enough to read all of Book 2 at least.
Just like the first book, which I also read in ill bodily health, I read this in one sitting. Completely demolished it. The entire storyline of moving into and clearing out the prison. All the new characters introduced, all the old characters lost. All of the “HOLY CRAP!” moments I had in which my 9 year old sister kept asking me “what happened?” about, that I of course could not tell her about. I love how this compilation really focused on the descent of sanity in such a situation and the pressure that has begun to build on the characters. Because as much as all of the blood and guts are cool, the stress of this situation and the human element involved in it is really what keeps me coming back.
I was hooked. I want more. I needed volume 3 as soon as I finished it. But of course it’s still at the library. Need it now.

4 of 70: The Walking Dead Book 2

Started: 12/28/10
Finished: 12/28/10

I started this book on my second trip back home. I stopped for the night at our lakehouse in Somerville to be with my family who had been up there while I was back at work in Austin for 2 days. By the time I got to the house, I felt like complete crap. My sugar had crashed earlier in the day and I had a massive headache which was causing me to be nauseous, and then I drove for an hour and a half in dim light to the house, in the rain. But enough complaining: suffice it to say, I felt like crap. So after I arrived and crashed for a good hour or so, I woke up, feeling a little better, enough to read all of Book 2 at least.

Just like the first book, which I also read in ill bodily health, I read this in one sitting. Completely demolished it. The entire storyline of moving into and clearing out the prison. All the new characters introduced, all the old characters lost. All of the “HOLY CRAP!” moments I had in which my 9 year old sister kept asking me “what happened?” about, that I of course could not tell her about. I love how this compilation really focused on the descent of sanity in such a situation and the pressure that has begun to build on the characters. Because as much as all of the blood and guts are cool, the stress of this situation and the human element involved in it is really what keeps me coming back.

I was hooked. I want more. I needed volume 3 as soon as I finished it. But of course it’s still at the library. Need it now.

3 of 70: Behemoth by Scott Westerfeld
Started: 12/25/10Finished: 12/27/10 
Lucky for me, the second book of the Leviathan trilogy is already out, and my mother had borrowed it from the reading teacher at the school she herself teaches at. Westerfeld had visited her school a few months back, so the copy she borrowed from Mr. Parks (who was *my* 8th grade english teacher and is now my sisters) she borrowed a signed copy. I was maybe more than a little excited to be reading a signed copy.
Behemoth continued to build upon the strong story that Westerfeld already established in Leviathan, and built more so upon the world. I raced through this book just like I did the last. I can’t recommend them enough and I can’t wait to get my hands on the third installment in the series.
SPOLIER ALERT: (?)I’m excited to see how all of this ends up, how this alternate WWI goes, how the relationship between “Dylan” and Alek works out, where the Leviathan is headed, and why exactly Bovril is so damn important, even if he is kind of handy sometimes.

3 of 70: Behemoth by Scott Westerfeld

Started: 12/25/10
Finished: 12/27/10 

Lucky for me, the second book of the Leviathan trilogy is already out, and my mother had borrowed it from the reading teacher at the school she herself teaches at. Westerfeld had visited her school a few months back, so the copy she borrowed from Mr. Parks (who was *my* 8th grade english teacher and is now my sisters) she borrowed a signed copy. I was maybe more than a little excited to be reading a signed copy.

Behemoth continued to build upon the strong story that Westerfeld already established in Leviathan, and built more so upon the world. I raced through this book just like I did the last. I can’t recommend them enough and I can’t wait to get my hands on the third installment in the series.

SPOLIER ALERT: (?)
I’m excited to see how all of this ends up, how this alternate WWI goes, how the relationship between “Dylan” and Alek works out, where the Leviathan is headed, and why exactly Bovril is so damn important, even if he is kind of handy sometimes.

2 of 70: Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld
Started: 12/22/10Finished 12/24/10 
I’m going to tell you all this now before we get too far into this: You will be seeing a LOT of Young Adult Fiction. Primarily Sci-fi/Fantasy/Adventure stuff. YA Fiction, is probably my favorite genre, despite my being a 20 year old, I still have the literary heart of a 15 year old. And as Julia said, I’m not an “Old Adult” yet so i’m still allowed. It’s what i’ve spent most of my life reading, there is a reason I was such a huge book worm as a child, and it’s because I love the escape these books offer. The new worlds they create. 
Also, there is SO much really good YA Sci-fi/fantasy coming out right now. I spent most of my break in bookstores and libraries, and I want to read all of it. These books look good as hell. And it makes me wonder why these kids still waste their time with Twilight. 
ANYWAYS! On Leviathan: I’ve read Westerfeld’s Uglies series and loved it. I actually just finished it this past semester when I *finally* read Extras (my sister is in the middle of the series herself and bought the book) And holy SHIT. I was blown away by Leviathan. I really was. Westerfeld showed once again that he is amazing at creating alternate technological realities. But this time it’s a past adventure and an almost complete reconstruction of WWI era Europe, and it’s steam punk as hell. I loved the alternate history Westerfeld created as well as the character relationships. I love how all the small details completely make this book. Westerfeld is a master of small details that bring together this huge big picture. He not only tells a story but creates a whole new world, and he makes sure the reader can live in it themselves.
In my opinion this was an excellent opener to what will surely be a most excellent trilogy.

2 of 70: Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld

Started: 12/22/10
Finished 12/24/10 

I’m going to tell you all this now before we get too far into this: You will be seeing a LOT of Young Adult Fiction. Primarily Sci-fi/Fantasy/Adventure stuff. YA Fiction, is probably my favorite genre, despite my being a 20 year old, I still have the literary heart of a 15 year old. And as Julia said, I’m not an “Old Adult” yet so i’m still allowed. It’s what i’ve spent most of my life reading, there is a reason I was such a huge book worm as a child, and it’s because I love the escape these books offer. The new worlds they create. 

Also, there is SO much really good YA Sci-fi/fantasy coming out right now. I spent most of my break in bookstores and libraries, and I want to read all of it. These books look good as hell. And it makes me wonder why these kids still waste their time with Twilight. 

ANYWAYS! On Leviathan: I’ve read Westerfeld’s Uglies series and loved it. I actually just finished it this past semester when I *finally* read Extras (my sister is in the middle of the series herself and bought the book) And holy SHIT. I was blown away by Leviathan. I really was. Westerfeld showed once again that he is amazing at creating alternate technological realities. But this time it’s a past adventure and an almost complete reconstruction of WWI era Europe, and it’s steam punk as hell. I loved the alternate history Westerfeld created as well as the character relationships. I love how all the small details completely make this book. Westerfeld is a master of small details that bring together this huge big picture. He not only tells a story but creates a whole new world, and he makes sure the reader can live in it themselves.

In my opinion this was an excellent opener to what will surely be a most excellent trilogy.

1 of 70: The Walking Dead: Book 1
Started: 12/21/10Finished: 12/21/10
I’m beginning this blog with what I read when I started the actual vacation part of my winter break.
I left for home (Katy, Texas) for 5 days on the 21st and promptly started reading. I spent the first night at home in my dad’s lazy boy recliner, attached to a heating pad (terrible back pain) and read all of Book One. 
I had followed the show as it aired on TV, one of the few shows I have done this with since starting college, and I am incredibly impatient, I don’t think I can wait a whole year to be more involved with the world of the walking dead, and I do love me some comic books. So I ended up checking out Volumes 1 and 2 from the University Library.
First of all, the comic is so much more detailed, and there are so many more story lines that are able to be brought to life in this (it’s original) format. I love the direction it’s taking already and i’m beginning to feel a keen loss of all of the things that the show hasn’t included yet, and I wonder if it ever will include those things. I hope so.

1 of 70: The Walking Dead: Book 1

Started: 12/21/10
Finished: 12/21/10

I’m beginning this blog with what I read when I started the actual vacation part of my winter break.

I left for home (Katy, Texas) for 5 days on the 21st and promptly started reading. I spent the first night at home in my dad’s lazy boy recliner, attached to a heating pad (terrible back pain) and read all of Book One. 

I had followed the show as it aired on TV, one of the few shows I have done this with since starting college, and I am incredibly impatient, I don’t think I can wait a whole year to be more involved with the world of the walking dead, and I do love me some comic books. So I ended up checking out Volumes 1 and 2 from the University Library.

First of all, the comic is so much more detailed, and there are so many more story lines that are able to be brought to life in this (it’s original) format. I love the direction it’s taking already and i’m beginning to feel a keen loss of all of the things that the show hasn’t included yet, and I wonder if it ever will include those things. I hope so.